dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
I posted another entry at [community profile] treatyoselfcomm because I am finally going to finish Common Cause, my GI Joe/Transformers crossover that is rapidly approaching its 10th birthday. I'm also planning on giving it a good editing (there's some language choices I'm not happy with, but otherwise I think it's held up pretty well).
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
I signed up for [community profile] treatyoselfcomm, (An) exchange "designed to reduce your backlog. Creators signup with works that they want to work on, and then are matched to someone who is interested in helping them. You create for six weeks, and then the archive is revealed with your work(s). There are no restrictions on fandoms, type of work you're creating, or character or ship eligibility.
where."

The story I'm planning on working on is set in my superhero universe, but follows different characters from the book I wrote. Here's the summary I wrote for the challenge:


Summary: First, the Elevator Pitch:Will Cartright is known in Gem City as the 'Shamus Who Knows No Shame' because he's willing to investigate superheroes and help hold them accountable for their actions. Or, as he puts it, "Who watches the watchmen? I do -- for fifty bucks an hour plus expenses."

When his friend Kylie hires him to clear her father's name after her Pop-pop is accused of murdering Titan of the Third Coast Crusaders, Will is reluctant to take the job, but agrees out of sentiment and because Kylie's other father (Howler's ex) is willing to foot the bill for Will's services. Loyalty to a friend is all well and good, but a client with deep pockets is nothing to be sneezed at, after all.

Will has to navigate the world of high profile heroes to get to the truth and save Howler -- and also get paid.

Notes: Will was originally conceived as a "Reverse Batman" character -- namely, he's the child of minor supervillains who were unjustifiably killed by a vigilante hero when Will was a boy. Will has dedicated his life to being the one to keep those with great power accountable to their great responsibilities.

Howler is a Wolverine Expy and the Third Coast Crusaders are X-Men stand ins. Titan is Cyclops; Howler is accused of his murder because of a Logan/Scott/Jean style love triangle. I started this idea years ago and would like to finish it. I really need help in plotting out the Whodunit part of the story.

The genre is prose superhero fiction, along the lines of works like Seanan McGuire's Velveteen Vs. stories or novels like April Daniels' Dreadnought or Sara Kuhn's Heroine Complex. Essentially, this is an attempt at creating a comic book universe using words instead of pictures.
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
If you had to make up a list of, for lack of a better word, archetypal superheroes, who would you include? I'm looking for a list of characters who folks would consider to be the superhero equivalent to the founding members of the profession. I'm trying to develop a core group of founding heroes for my superhero universe and I'm looking for ideas for archetypes to base them around.

I've got a Captain America Expy, for example. And a Professor X (and a Magneto; I would also be open to suggestions for archetypal supervillains/rogues/foils).
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Anybody know of a good resource for worldbuilding questions that is aimed more at science fiction/modern setting worlds rather than fantasy/historical settings?

ETA: Specifically superheroic/comic book-style universe building would be most excellently appropriate.
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Found this while looking for writing prompt bingo card communities. It's a bingo card generator that you can either use to create your own bingo card (i.e. give it a list of prompts of your own choosing) or use one of a variety of pre-generated lists. It allows you to create cards as small as 1x1 and as large as 7x7.

It's located here: http://an.owomoyela.net/fun/bingo_generator#generated_card

I found it thanks to http://allbingo.dreamwidth.org/
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
In the case of an actual Writer Freak Out I probably wouldn't be posting, I'd be curled up on my bed whining about how much I suck. 'Cause, yeah...

Found this article earlier today: The Writer’s Toolkit: The Alpha and The Omega of your novel. It talks about having a kernal idea for your book and how important it is and at first I was like, "But I don't have a kernal idea!" (complete with whingy self-pity, no extra charge!) but then I actually sat down and read the article when I was awake and found out that the kernal idea can be:

The kernel idea is the foundation of your novel. When I say idea, I don’t necessarily mean the theme, although it can be. Or the most important incident, although it can be. But it can also be a setting. It can be a scene. It can be a character.

Which, yay! I do have! Not just for the book I'm working on but the rest of the books in the series -- well, the other three leading up to the one I'm working on (has anyone else ever started writing a series with Book 4?) so yay, happy!

So, there's a crisis averted...now just to finish writing the damned book.
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Just for bragging purposes, I want to mention that as of today I have reached 49,348 words in my Nanowrimo project for this year. I need to write another 652 words to reach my 50,000 word goal.

The project for this year is the post-apocalyptic universe that I worked on last year. Technically, I 'cheated' this year by incorporating stuff that I wrote last year but I also added a LOT of stuff that I didn't have last year and have actually come up with a plot, of all things!

I did something different this year: I wrote the entire project by hand. I haven't typed anything up yet (that starts in December, I am thinking), since doing so usually leads to me spending writing time backtracking by typing. I now have 160+ handwritten pages (in a 180 page notebook) and dozens upon dozens of sticky notes that make the notebook somewhat resemble a football.

But, and here's the important thing: I'm DOING IT this year! I'm actually doing it! And I'm going to finish this damn project and then move on to the damn project from 2007 because this writing thing is kinda/sorta becoming a habit now!

Yay!
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Ok, I signed up for [community profile] casestory and I get that casefic is pretty much the fannish term for 'mystery story' but...are there any other nuances that I should be aware of? Like, at [community profile] casestory, the first rule is:

Stories should be focused on a case/crime investigation/crime. Medical cases or other themes are also allowed as long as there is a case somehow involved.

And what I'm wondering is, what does 'other theme' mean/how could it be construed?

What I'm hoping is that the mystery in casefic doesn't have to be a murder, 'cause I love me some crime shows but murders are getting old, y'all.
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
But I do like this poem about a spider.

Spider
legs, eyes
meet, eat, greet
little, odd, creepy,hungry
Spider.

Denver. Canyon Springs MS, Austin

The poem was written for the 2010 Austin International Poetry Festival which I found out about on Guyslitwire's feed on LJ.

You can follow the link to read the blog about the contest and some of the other winners, but I want to quote this bit from the blogpost for truth and awesomeness: Whatever you do, write. Write what's in your heart, and share it with others. Because our innermost passion deserves to be shared, not swallowed like a lump of burning coal.
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
The notes for Chapter Two have been removed since I do not want to cause offense. If you're interested in purchasing a copy of "Them's Fighting Words" you can follow this link: Them’s Fighting Words: How to Write Fight Scenes by Teel James Glenn. It's certainly worth picking up!

Longer Edit: Chapter Two of the book talked about the reasons for a fight to happen within a story and gives reasons for why a fight might occur -- any of which can be used individually or in various combinations for a particular fight scene. Glenn demonstrates the various points with exerpts from his own work so you can see how these points can be used within a story context.

Brief Chapter Summaries: -- Note, each chaper also has a writing exercise at the end that pertains to the chapter you've read, making this textbook and workshop in one. You can also read an exerpt from the book on the author's website: Why The Fight?

Chapter 1: Do You want Fries with your Violence?: The purpose of conflict -- physical and emotional -- in drama.

Chapter 2: Can't We All Just Get Along?: -- The reasons why a fight might happen (see above)

Chapter 3: Bruise and Consequence: -- covers the use of cinematic techniques in prose storytelling

Chapter 4: How to Build a Better Beating: -- gets into how to plan a fight.

Chapter 5: Autopsy Turvy: -- Glenn dissects in detail a fight scene he's written to show the structure.

Chapter 6: Never Try to Reinvent the Wheel: -- looking to past masters of action-adventure fiction for inspiration: R.E Howard (Conan; Solomon Kane), Lester Dent (among other things, wrote Doc Savage under the house name Kenneth Robeson) and Edgar Rice Burroughs (see chapter 7 description).

Chapter 7: Seeing Red: What the Thark Do you mean by That?: -- a further examination of the works and worlds of Edgar Rice Burroughs, creator of John Carter of Mars and Tarzan of the Apes.

Chapter 8: Tiptoe on Giants' Shoulders: -- An examination of the work of Alexander Dumas, Sir Walter Scott and H. Rider Haggard, the guys the folks in chapter 6 looked to for their inspirations.

Chapter 9: Wherefore Martial Art Thou? -- Any book on fighting scenes needs to have a chapter on Martial Arts. This is that chapter.

Chapter 10: Is That a Sword in Your Pocket? -- Ditto above, only this time about swords.

Chapter 11: Movies With an Edge: -- The author's picks for the 10 best western swordfight movies.

Chapter 12: Just a Little Nippon Tuck: -- The history of the Samurai.

Chapter 13: Chambara of Good News: -- The author's picks for the dozen best samurai films.

Chapter 14: Fighting with your clothes...no, not your zipper: -- The use of costume and clothing and how it can shape a combat scene.

Chapter 15: When Styles Collide: -- Mixing fighting styles in a combat scene. The author draws on his experiences as a fight coordinator for TV and movies for this one.

Suggested Reading List: -- The advice in the book makes the book worth the purchase price, but the reading list in the back is just that much more of a reason to snatch this up. Ditto the Suggested Websites List that follows the reading list.

dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
I bought my first ever ebook today. I stumbled over it when I was looking for information on writing fight scenes, partly for 7_Conflicts and partly because action scenes are one area in which I know I could use all the help I can get. The book is called Them’s Fighting Words: How to Write Fight Scenes by Teel James Glenn. It’s one of the few actual books on the subject that I’ve found and was definately worth the $6.50

8/5/2007: Edited to remove notes; if you're interested in learning more, I recommend checking the book out. It's worth the purchase price 8) For a more detailed summary of the book's contents, click here: Them's Fighting Words -- Chapter Two (edited 8/5/2007)

In addition, you can also get some advice on writing fight scenes from the following links:

Fight Scene Writing Links )
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Of "Said" and Beyond:

Some more in-depth information on writing and formatting and generally handling dialogue.

Thanks to restriction@Transficsation for catching an error

Of Said and Beyond )
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Punctuating Dialogue: A Cheat Sheet:


This was originally written for a GI Joe fan fiction writers' workshop I was a part of. I've since adapted it for Transformers fandom. Which basically involved changing GI Joe quotes to Transformers quotes.

Source: Writing Dialogue by Tom Chiarella. Story Press: Cincinnati, OH, 1998. The bits in bold are direct quotes from Mr. Chiarella's book; quotes used are taken from Rob Powers’s collections of Transformers quotes (specifically the G1 and Beast Wars cartoon and the G1 comics lists). Anything else is written by dunmurderin.

Dialogue Punctuation Cheat Sheet )
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
From beckyh2112, who stole it from koh4711.

1. Pick one of my characters, any one (even if you're only familiar with a vague description instead of a name).
2. I will tell you the origin of his/her name.
3. I will tell you random facts surrounding his/her creation.
4. I will give you a random fact of his/her backstory.
5. I will give you a random fact of his/her forestory.
6. You may ask me up to ten questions about the character
7. I will give you one TMI fact. (And if you don't want that, please specify.)

Forestory, in this instance, is either measured from the latest chronological fanfic I've written them in, or, if they haven't appeared in a fanfic, from the starting point of the canon they come from.

Since I mainly write canon characters, I'll also open this up to any characters you'd like to see me do a fic about. And, potentially, I might actually write a fic about 'em!

Also, if you want to know more about my small stable of OCs, you can pick one of them from this list here: Original Character Master List

Dun
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Meta: Slash readers/writers and bisexuality -- found it via metafandom, pondering it for possible blathering later.

Dun.
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
Because I have trouble remembering some of these names and I want a handy-dandy list to keep track of 'em. The horizontal breaks indicate divisions between groups of related characters. Please note, many of these characters are ones *I* haven’t written about yet, so they’re not fully formed yet. They’re largely just kicking about in the head waiting for inspiration to strike and for them to get called to the front lines and brutally set down on the page. These are largely just notes for my own amusement and reference. This is a work in progress and will periodically be added to as I alter these characters to suit my tastes.

FC )
dunmurderin: A clownfish, orange and white, with a banner saying he is NOT a Combaticon!  So no one mistakes him for one, y'know? (Default)
"Good Girls (and Boys) Don't" Thought this was a cool article about flawed characters in fiction. Not big Flaws, but the little, every day ones that make characters more human or at least more 'real.'

Dun.

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